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Inclusion and Learners with Exceptionalities

Hello!

 I'm Anne Graf, Librarian for Education. I love questions, so please email me if you have one! ajumonvi @ trinity.edu. For more resources, there are also related guides to Research in School Psychology and Educational Curriculum Resources.

For Fall 2019: I will be on leave from late Sept through the end of the semester. During this time please contact Benjamin Harris, bharris (at trinity) for help!

FAQs

Citing Sources in Education: APA Style Examples

 

SAMPLE APA CITATION FOR A JOURNAL ARTICLE:

SAMPLE IN-TEXT CITATION:

Parenthetical Citation: (Author Last Name, Year of Publication)
Example: (Welch, 2005)

To make the citation of the source less distracting, the APA also suggests mentioning the author in the essay’s content so that only the year of publication and page number may be required in the parenthetical reference.

Attribution in text: Author Last Name (Year of Publication) has argued this point.
Example: Welch (2005) has argued this point.

Page numbers are not required in APA in-text citation. However, it is highly suggested that these be included. To include references to a specific part of the text, add the page number or chapter number after the year.

For more examples, see in-text citation and notes.

 

APA CITATIONS FOR A WEBSITE:

Much of the web content you'll see for this class will be attributed to an organization, not a specific author.  In some cases it will make sense to make the organization itself the author, but not in all cases. For the latter, to help the reader understand the authority of the source, make an effort in the text of whatever you are writing (or presenting) to use the name of the organization, i.e., The American Association on Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities defines an intellectual disability as "....." ("Definition of Intellectual Disability," n.d.).

SIMPLE EXAMPLE USING ORGANIZATION AS AUTHOR:

Project Ideal (2013). Speech or language impairments. Retrieved from http://www.projectidealonline.org/v/speech-language-impairments/

 

Most databases and Google Scholar have automatic "cite this" features. These can save time in creating citations (as can web-based citation generators), but they need to be double-checked. It's machine-generated information and only as good as the metadata available.

For examples of correct formatting and guidance, here are three useful websites:

Library Citing Sources Page (basic citation styles)

Purdue OWL (citations plus more about other aspects of APA formatting, such as document formatting, etc.)

APA Style Blog (specific issues and examples)